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Speaker Biographies

 

 

 

Graham Boyd is the founder and director of the ACLU Drug Law Reform Project, a division of the national American Civil Liberties Union. The Project’s goal is to end punitive drug policies that cause the widespread violation of constitutional and human rights, as well as unprecedented levels of incarceration. Founded in 1998 and located in Santa Cruz, California, the Project brings lawsuits throughout the country with lasting impact on public understanding of, and government response to, drug use and drug policies. Mr. Boyd recently brought to favorable settlement a class action lawsuit against a narcotics task force in Hearne, Texas that fabricated evidence against a significant portion of the town’s African American population. He has also litigated a First Amendment case concerning the rights of doctors to recommend medical marijuana to patients in Walters v. Conant. In March 2002, Mr. Boyd argued before the Supreme Court of the United States in a case concerning drug testing of high school students who participate in extracurricular activities, Board of Education v. Earls. Mr. Boyd’s other cases include a ruling striking down the nation’s first program of drug testing welfare recipients; a ruling that stopped drug testing of all students in the first school in the nation to implement universal drug testing; a First Amendment ruling to require the District of Columbia to release the results of the vote on its medical marijuana ballot initiative; a ruling to prevent police abuses in the first court challenge to protect the rights of needle exchange participants; a decision recognizing under federal law the religious right of a Rastafarian to use marijuana; and ending the use of drug-sniffing dogs against kindergarten and elementary school students. Mr. Boyd graduated summa cum laude from Yale University in 1987 and received his J.D. from Yale Law School in 1992.

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Mark Haden, MSW, currently works for the Vancouver Coastal Health as a clinical supervisor at the Pacific Spirit Community Health Centre. He received his Masters of Social Work from the University of British Columbia, and has been working in the addictions field since 1984. He has worked in Detox, Methadone and Out Patient settings in counselling, supervisory and management roles, and has also published on the issue of drug policy in the Canadian Journal of Public Health and the International Journal of Drug Policy. In addition to his clinical work, Haden provides public education on drugs and drug policy. He is also a parent of two children and an active member of his community.

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Mark A. R. Kleiman is Professor of Public Policy and Director of the Drug Policy Analysis Program in the School of Public Affairs at UCLA. His research focuses on drug policy and crime control, and he is widely identified with the proposal to institute frequent drug testing and automatic sanctions for drug use for drug-involved offenders on probation and parole. Prof. Kleiman is also the editor of the Drug Policy Analysis Bulletin, and the Chairman of BOTEC Analysis Corporation, which provides policy advice to governments at all levels on the issues of drug, crime and health. He is the author of two books: Marijuana: Costs of Abuse, Costs of Control and Against Excess: Drug Policy for Results. He is currently working on a book with the working title When Brute Force Fails: Strategic Thinking for Crime Control. He also publishes a weblog at http://www.markarkleiman.com. In addition to his academic work, Prof. Kleiman serves as a policy adviser on drug problems to various government entities. He has recently published a report for the Congressional Research Service on the link between terrorism and the illicit drug trade. Before joining UCLA, Prof. Kleiman taught at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, where he received his Ph.D. in Public Policy. He did his undergraduate work in political science, philosophy, and economics at Haverford College. From 1979-1983, he served in the Office of Policy and Management Analysis of the Criminal Division of the United States Department of Justice, first as Deputy Director for Drug Control Programs and then as Acting Director and Director. In those positions, he worked on the emerging problem of Southwest Asian heroin, on asset forfeiture, and on the development of “reverse undercover” or “reverse sting” operations.

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Andy Ko is Director of the Drug Policy Reform Project for the America Civil Liberties Union of Washington. He graduated from New York University in 1989 and received a Skadden Fellowship to represent homeless families with the Legal Aid Society of New York City’s Homeless Rights Project, where he remained as a staff attorney for eight years. In 1997, he took a position with Columbia Legal Services in Washington State, where he represented indigent clients in public assistance, housing and other subsistence-related legal matters. In March of 2001, Andy began his current job with the ACLU of Washington, where he works to reform drug policies and to end the criminalization of people whose lives are affected by drugs.

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G. Alan Marlatt is Professor of Psychology and Director of the Addictive Behaviors Research Center at the University of Washington. He received his Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Indiana University in 1968. After serving on the faculties of the University of British Columbia (1968-1969) and the University of Wisconsin (1969-1972), he joined the University of Washington faculty in the fall of 1972. His major focus in both research and clinical work is the field of addictive behaviors. In addition to over 200 journal articles and book chapters, he has published several books in the addictions field, including Relapse Prevention (1985; 2005), Assessment of Addictive Behaviors (1988; 2005), Harm Reduction (1998), and Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students (BASICS): A Harm Reduction Approach (1999). Over the course of the past 30 years, he has received continuous funding for his research from a variety of agencies including the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the Alcoholic Beverage Medical Research Foundation, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. In 1990, Dr. Marlatt was awarded The Jellinek Memorial Award for outstanding contributions to knowledge in the field of alcohol studies, in 2001 he was given the Innovators in Combating Substance Abuse Award by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and in 2004 he received the Distinguished Researcher Award from the Research Society on Alcoholism.

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Doug McVay is a writer, researcher, speaker and organizer with a long history in drug policy reform. McVay is the editor of Drug War Facts and maintains the Common Sense family of websites, including: CSDP, Drug War Facts, Drug War Distortions, Managing Chronic Pain, and Addict In The Family. McVay has been active in drug policy reform efforts since organizing a NORML chapter at the University of Iowa in 1983. He went on to work with the Oregon Marijuana Initiative/Ballot Measure Five campaign during the 1985-1986 election cycle as their petitioning coordinator and assistant director. McVay worked for the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML) as their Activists/Projects Coordinator from 1987 to 1990. In 1989, he co-founded and began working with the Cannabis Action Network (CAN); he is currently a member of CAN's Board of Directors. McVay is also a member of the advisory board for Students for Sensible Drug Policy. He is a court-qualified expert witness on the subjects of marijuana use, sales and cultivation, and has testified in both State and Federal courts in the US. McVay is also a cancer survivor and medical marijuana patient.

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Sen. Claude Pierre Nolin led the Canadian Parliament's Senate Select Committee on Illegal Drugs, which in September 2002 issued an exhaustive, comprehensive report calling for the legalization and regulation of marijuana in Canada. The committee’s work paved the way for the cannabis reform measures currently being considered by the Canadian government. Since the publication of the committee report, Nolin has become a notable presence on the international drug reform horizon. He received his law degree from the University of Ottawa. Nolin worked as a lawyer and in various positions in the Canadian government for 22 years, before being appointed to the Senate of Canada in 1993.

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Kris Nyrop is Executive Director of Street Outreach Services, which is an independent non-profit dedicated to reducing the harm associated with substance use through innovative outreach and education. He has worked in the area of HIV prevention with injection drug users since 1988. During that time he has worked as a frontline outreach worker, researcher, trainer, and public health specialst. He has worked in the United States, Canada, and the Russian Federation.

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Eugene Oscapella was associated with the Law Reform Commission of Canada over a 14 year period, and was the first chairman of that body's Drug Policy Group. Mr. Oscapella is a founding member of the Canadian Foundation for Drug Policy, an independent organization created to examine Canada’s drug laws and policies. For several years he sat on the policy committee of the Canadian Criminal Justice Association. He has appeared many times before Canadian Parliamentary committees on drug policy issues, most recently the Canadian Senate Special Committee on Illegal Drugs and the House of Commons Special Committee on the Non-medical Use of Drugs. He lectures on drug policy issues in the Department of Criminology at the University of Ottawa and has lectured and been published widely in Canada and abroad on drug policy issues. He completed undergraduate studies in economics at the University of Toronto in 1974 and received his Bachelor of Laws degree from the University of Ottawa in 1977. He obtained his Master of Laws degree from the London School of Economics and Political Science in 1979. He was called to the Ontario Bar in 1980. From 1980 to 81, Mr. Oscapella served as a commission counsel with the McDonald Commission of Inquiry into the RCMP. From 1982 to 85, he was Director of Legislation and Law Reform for the Canadian Bar Association. Since 1985, Mr. Oscapella has been an independent adviser to government and private sector interests on Canadian legislative and public policy issues.

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Craig Reinarman is Professor of Sociology and legal studies at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and Visiting Scholar at the Center for Drug Research at the University of Amsterdam. He has served on the board of directors of the College on Problems of Drug Dependence, as a consultant to the World Health Organization's Programme on Substance Abuse, and as principal investigator on research grants from the National Institute of Drug Abuse and the National Institute of Justice. Dr. Reinarman is the author of American States of Mind (Yale University Press, 1987) and co-author of Cocaine Changes (Temple University Press, 1991) and co-editor of Crack in America (University of California Press, 1997). He has published numerous articles on drug use, law and policy in such journals as Theory and Society, the British Journal of Addiction, the International Journal of Drug Policy, Addiction Research, and Contemporary Drug Problems.

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Peter Reuter is Professor in the School of Public Policy and in the Department of Criminology at the University of Maryland. He is Director of the newly formed Center on the Economics of Crime and Justice Policy at the University and also Senior Economist at RAND. He founded and directed RAND’s Drug Policy Research Center from 1989-1993; the Center is a multi-disciplinary research program begun in 1989 with funding from a number of foundations. His early research focused on the organization of illegal markets and resulted in the publication of Disorganized Crime: The Economics of the Visible Hand (MIT Press, 1983), which won the Leslie Wilkins award as most outstanding book of the year in criminology and criminal justice. Since 1985 most of his research has dealt with alternative approaches to controlling drug problems, both in the United States and Western Europe. His other books are (with Robert MacCoun) Drug War Heresies: Learning from Other Places, Times and Vices (Cambridge University Press, 2001 and (with Edwin Truman) Chasing Dirty Money: The Fight Agaisnt Money Laundering (Institute for International Economics, 2004). He is currently directing a project on global heroin markets.

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Norm Stamper was a police officer for 34 years. He served as chief of the Seattle Police Department from 1994 to 2000. Prior to that he was executive assistant chief of the San Diego Police Department. In his 28 years with SDPD he served as a deputy chief in each of the agency’s bureaus, including field operations, investigations, management services, and personnel services. As Seattle’s police chief, he led a process of major organizational restructuring, eliminating one rank and creating new bureaus of Professional Responsibility, Community Policing, and Family and Youth Protection. He earned his bachelor and master’s degrees in criminal justice administration from San Diego State University and his Ph.D. in leadership and human behavior from United States International University. He is a graduate of the FBI’s National Executive Institute. Over the past three decades he has conducted organizational effectiveness and leadership training and consulting for both public and private organizations throughout North America. Norm Stamper is the author of Breaking Rank: A Top Cop’s Exposé of the Dark Side of American Policing (Nation Books, 2005) and Removing Managerial Barriers to Effective Police Leadership (Police Executive Research Forum, Washington, D.C., 1992). For additional information on Breaking Rank, visit www.normstamper.com.

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Sanho Tree is a Fellow and Director of the Drug Policy Project at the Institute for Policy Studies in Washington, DC. Since 1998, the project has worked to end the domestic and international “War on Drugs” and replace it with policies that promote public health and safety as well as economic alternatives to the prohibition drug economy. The intersection of race and poverty in the drug war is at the heart of the project’s work. In recent years the project has focused on the attendant “collateral damage” caused by the US exporting its drug war to Colombia and Afghanistan. Establishing humane and sustainable alternatives to the drug war fits into the IPS mandate as one of the major contemporary social justice issues at home and abroad. He was featured in the ABC/John Stossel documentary on the drug war which aired in July 2002 and has also appeared on Politically Incorrect with Bill Maher. Mr. Tree is also a former military and diplomatic historian and he has collaborated in the past with Dr. Gar Alperovitz on The Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb and the Architecture of an American Myth (Knopf, 1995). From 1996-97, he assisted entertainer Harry Belafonte and continues to work as an occasional consultant for him on international issues. He was also associate editor of CovertAction Quarterly, an award-winning magazine of investigative journalism. In the late 1980s he worked at the International Human Rights Law Group. Currently, he serves on the boards of Witness for Peace and Students for Sensible Drug Policy.

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Stephen J. Ziegler, PhD, JD, is an Assistant Professor of Public & Environmental Affairs at Indiana Univeristy- Purdue University, Fort Wayne, Indiana. Dr. Ziegler's research focuses on the institutional and legal barriers to the relief of pain and end of life decision making. He has published in a variety of peer-reviewed journals and is an editor for the Journal of Opioid Management. Dr. Ziegler was a Mayday Pain Scholar in 2003 and presented his research at the National Press Club in DC along with his co-principal investigator Dr. Nicholas Lovrich of Washington State University. Dr. Ziegler was also an invited invited speaker at the World Institute of Pain in Barcelona, Spain last year, and recently returned from Zurich, Switzerland where he studied the Swiss model of assisted suicide and its potential to inform U.S. policy on clinical decision making and end of life care (funding for his research was made possible through a grant from The Greenwall Foundation of New York). Dr. Ziegler has also been a member of several professional associations such as the American College of Legal Medicine, American Society of Law, Medicine, and Ethics, American Society of Criminology, Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, the Law & Society Association, and the American Political Science Association. Prior to obtaining his PhD, Dr. Ziegler clerked and practiced law at both the state and federal levels (defense and prosecution), worked as a federal task-force officer for the Drug Enforcement Administration (U.S. Department of Justice), and served as both a uniformed police officer and as a police detective.

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